Haere Mai Value Award

This award is for a team or individual who truly show the value of Haere Mai by putting people at ease, seeing the whole person and explaining the environment and by doing so have achieved better Māori health outcomes. This could include whānau experience, eliminating inequities or developing the workforce.

Finalists

  • Regional Youth Forensic Service, Kari Centre, and Hāpai Ora – Mental Health Team of Cultural Advisors

  • Leaisa Bartley – Care Coordinator, Auckland  Diabetes Centre, Greenlane Clinical Centre

  • Moira Rapana, Kai Atawhai, Te Whetu Tawera

Winner

  • Regional Youth Forensic Service, Kari Centre, and Hāpai Ora – Mental Health Team of Culture Advisors. 

    This outstanding team works in our child and adolescent mental health and forensic services to make sure that the needs of Māori whānau, pēpi, tamariki, and rangatahi are better understood and met. They make sure that Māori are welcomed into our services in a manner that is culturally safe and mana enhancing. They have made a significant contribution towards eliminating health inequities by improving access and engagement for Māori youth and their whānau.

Manaaki Value Award

This award is for a team or individual who truly show the value of Manaaki and has achieved better Māori health outcomes by listening to different points of view. Someone who shows compassion and integrity and protects dignity and privacy .

Finalists

  • Oonagh Lithgow, Nurse Specialist, Liver Transplant Service

  • Beth Poi, Senior Nurse, Acute Surgical Unit

  • Regional Youth Forensic Service, Child Adolescent Mental Health Services

Winner

  • Beth Poi, Senior Nurse, Acute Surgical Unit. 

    The Matāriki Values Award, in the Manaaki category, is a perfect way to describe and recognise the commitment of this amazing Wahine. Beth serves our people in a respectful and honest way making sure whānau experience and engagement is present.

    She recognises that Manaaki is part of our Tikanga practice. Beth is passionate about Te Reo Māori which is evident when you talk to her. She possesses a sincerity that allows people to talk to her freely and without judgement.

Tūhono Value Award

This award is for a team or individual who truly show the value of Tūhono by sharing learnings and achieving as a team with colleagues, patients and whānau and by doing so improve whānau experience, eliminate inequities or has developed the workforce.

Finalists

  • Rangimarie Taurerewa, Staff Nurse, Ward 74

  • Katie Quinney and Māori Nurses, Surgical Services Directorate

  • Te Hononga o Tamaki me Hoturoa 

Winners

  • Te Hononga o Tamaki me Hoturoa. 

    Te Hononga set out to improve access to cardiac rehabilitation by delivering home and hospital-based education sessions. Through tūhono the team worked to reduce barriers like transport that often prevented Māori from accessing cardiac rehabilitation. This has been done by delivering cardiac rehabilitation sessions via whānau ora registered nurses, lifestyle coaches and social support.

    Collaboration with Auckland DHB to deliver a multi-disciplinary heart failure exercise pilot programme with Whānaungatanga has been pivotal in fostering cohesion of all the Māori participants on the programme.

  • Katie Quinney and Māori Nurses, Surgical Services Directorate. 

    A hui for Māori nurses at Manawanui Marae was the start of a deliberate process to strengthen the development of the Māori health professional workforce within the Surgical Directorate. Surgical leaders brought a desire to listen and engage Māori perspectives. Collaboration with Māori leaders overcame the potential for the intent to fail in the face of uncertainty and other pressures. During the design and facilitation of the hui, leaders wove together their strands of knowledge and wisdom into an impactful experience grounded in tikanga. Participants connected with each other and leaders. Through sharing of knowledge and experience they recognised the value of the unique cultural skillset they bring as Māori health professionals and that this improves Māori health outcomes. The hui engendered the belief that we “could be Māori at work” and participants left knowing their professional development mattered. This was enabled by working with values of Tūhono and kotahitanga.

Angamua Value Award

This award is for a team or individual who truly show the value of Angamua by aspiring to excellence and the safest care and in doing so has achieved better Māori health outcomes. This could include whānau experience, eliminating inequities or developing the workforce.

Finalists

  • Te Roopu Whakamaru, Starship

  • Nursing Development Unit – Manawa Awhi

  • Te Puaruruhau and Auckland Regional Dental Service

Winner

  • Te Puaruruhau and Auckland Regional Dental Service. 

    The Gateway Clinic at Te Puaruruhau and the Child Protection Unit at Starship Children’s Hospital partnered with the Auckland Regional Dental Service (ARDS) to achieve better engagement with ARDS and attendance of follow up appointments in the community.

    A Gateway Assessment found that nearly 2/3 of children attending the Gateway clinic identify themselves as Māori. Only 8% of the children were up to date with their dental care at the time of the referral to the Gateway assessment meaning many missed out on free dental care for years.

    Over time relationships with stakeholders were enhanced to get the best outcome for each child and family and visits were made to Oranga Tamariki sites to increase awareness around oral health. Flexibility meant large sibling groups could be seen at the same time and could use clinics closer to the family.

    Out of the remaining children, 98% attended an appointment in an ARDS community clinic, an outstanding increase from the 8% baseline.