For more inspiration, read about the different specialities, find the right groups to contact, see if the income levels suit you and what specialists think about their chosen career. 

For information on non clinical careers and international medical graudates (IMGs) click here.

Specialties

  • Anaesthesia

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    Anaesthesia training - 2019 Auckland region RMO Careers Fair 

    Anaesthesia training programme: A presentation by Dr Stacey Byers, Vocational Training Committee representative for the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists and Dr Elizabeth Dunn, Anaesthesia Fellow and Samuel Perrin, registrar in the anaesthetic training programme.

    About anaesthesia

    The role of the anaesthetist is to preserve and maintain the life of the patient during surgery and other procedures, and to supervise the patient during the recovery phase. Responsibilities include pre-anaesthetic assessment of the patient, constant supervision of the patient during anaesthesia and management of pain following surgery. The anaesthetist takes this role not only in relation to surgery in operating theatres but also for procedures in cardiac laboratories, endoscopy suites, imaging departments, labour wards and day surgery units. The role of the anaesthetist as a peri-operative physician is expanding. Anaesthetists work closely with surgeons, obstetricians, physicians and radiologists and are usually supported by anaesthetic technicians. Anaesthetics training involves a lot of supervision, particularly early on in the training scheme, and you should be prepared for frequent feedback in a constructive manner.

    Specialty contacts 

    Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists
    Vic 3004 Australia
    Tel: 00 61 3 9510 6299
    Fax: 00 61 3 9510 6786
    Email: training@anzca.edu.au
    Website: anzca.edu.au

    New Zealand office
    P O Box 25506
    Featherston Street
    Wellington 6146
    Tel: 04 499 6013
    Email: training@anzca.org.nz

    Kim Jamieson (ADHB) Chair Vocational Training Committee
    Sarah Nicolson (ADHB) Regional Education Officer
    Sarah Allen (ADHB) Supervisor of Training Anaes - Cardio, Thoracic ICU
    Tim Skinner (ADHB) Supervisor of Training for Anaes - National Women's
    Nadia Forbes, Ivan Bergman and Amber Chisholm (ADHB) Supervisor of Training for Anaes - Level 8 Adult & ED Anaes
    Peggy Yip (ADHB) Supervisor of Training for Anaes - Starship Children's Hospital
    Jennifer Taylor (CMDHB) Supervisor of Training
    Clare Fisher (WDHB) Supervisor of Training

    Anaesthesia factsheet

    Read more about anaesthesia
    Health workforce New Zealand. 

    Workforce 

    • There were 341 anaesthesia specialists active in New Zealand in 2000. This represents a growth of 19 per cent from 1994 and makes anaesthesia the third largest hospital specialty group (if all subspecialties of surgery and medicine are grouped together).
    • Some workforce analyses have recommended a specialist to population ratio of 1:10,000. The New Zealand ratio in 2000 was 1:11,235, indicating a shortfall of roughly 40 specialists.
    • Regions that are particularly undersupplied include Northland and Tairawhiti-Hawke’s Bay. 

    Income

    The income is relatively good, especially in private practice. Most anaesthetists combine public work with some proportion of private work.
    Annual incomes:

    • Consultant, public sector: $150,500–216,500 for a 40 hour week as per the MECA (more for a senior consultant who works overtime) plus reasonable leave and $16000 CME expenses.
    • Registrar: $70,000–170,000 depending on seniority and roster workload. 

    Due to individual contracts DHBs apply conditions and pay may vary. Call allowances are variable, but may add another $150 per year.

    New Zealand anaesthetists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • College of urgent care

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About the Royal New Zealand College of Urgent Care (RNZCUC)

    Urgent care is the study of urgent medical care from community urgent care clinics. Urgent care clinics are open seven days until at least 8pm, have x-ray services on site and manage urgent medical problems and accidents. Urgent care's ‘nearest neighbours’ are emergency medicine and general practice.

    Urgent care is the 13th largest of the 35 branches of medicine that the Medical Council of New Zealand recognises.

    It is the second largest branch by face-to-face patient consultations, with more than 2 million consultations per annum.

    Some urgent care physicians work in hospital emergency departments, but with a collegial relationship (as defined by the MCNZ) with an emergency medicine specialist. The advantages of urgent care as a career include:

    • The ability to begin work and earn immediately.
    • ‘Free training’ (out-of-pocket training costs covered in most cases, see cost of training below).
    • A training programme designed to be able to be done part-time, for example while raising a family.
    • Flexible work hours.
    • The option of owning and running a business, partial ownership, or salaried/consultancy terms with no ownership.

    The RNZCUC runs the urgent care training programme. It has about 300 members - 30% hospital based and 70% community based.

    Specialty contacts

    110 Lunn Ave
    Remuera
    Auckland
    Tel: (09) 527 7966
    Email: info@rnzcuc.org.nz 

    Dr Ainsley Goodman - Director of Clinical Training
    Email: ainsley_goodman@hotmail.com

    Vocational registration enquiries:

    David Gollogly - Chairperson Convenor Board of Censors
    Email: dag@xtra.co.nz

    Training information

    The RNZCUC training programme leads to a fellowship in urgent care. It is designed with the needs of part time trainees in mind. Fellowship criteria include four years and 3000 hours of experience. Up to 1500 hours of prior experience can be recognised.

    The main parts of the programme are:

    • the urgent care course and UCPEX examination
    • three university papers
    • an accreditation process. 

    Eligibility

    Doctors must be fully registered with the MCNZ or other RNZCUC-approved registration body and providing urgent care from a facility approved by RNZCUC for training. Trainees are accepted from the end of PGY1 onwards. PGY2 trainees must have a RNZCUC-approved study plan.

    To join the college training programme, complete the online application form on the RNZCUC website.

    Cost of training

    New Zealand residents are generally eligible for Health Workforce New Zealand (HWNZ) funding which aims to covers all trainees' main out-of-pocket expenses (including those listed below).

    For doctors who don't have HWNZ funding (general non-residents), as at February 2014, the main costs are about: 

    • UCC: $7165
    • UCPEX: $520
    • RNZCUC Membership / training fee: $800 per annum
    • University papers (*3): $1,200 each paper for residents; $4,000 for non-residents. 

    These costs are approximate, exclude GST, and are subject to change. 

    Doctors with overseas or alternative urgent care qualifications 

    Holders of qualifications such as a fellowship in an emergency medicine may be eligible for RNZCUC's accelerated pathway to fellowship.

    Urgent care factsheet

    Read more about urgent care
    Northern Regional Alliance.

    Workforce

    RNZCUC analysis indicates that only a quarter of urgent care consultations are provided by urgent care doctors. In RNZCUC’s view, urgent care fellow numbers need to at least double. RNZCUC expects that there will be strong demand for urgent care fellows for at least the next 10 years.

    Income

    Trainees generally earn well from the outset of training. For information about income, contact RNZCUC.

  • Emergency medicine

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    Emergency Medicine - RMO Careers Fair 2018

    About emergency medicine

    Emergency medicine is a unique specialist field of medicine that deals with the care of patients requiring urgent medical attention.

    The emergency medicine specialist has the responsibility for managing all patients in the emergency department, regardless of their underlying presentation, which can range from the mundane to the critically ill across all age ranges.

    The mix of patients is one of the many aspects of emergency medicine that many junior doctors find attractive. Medical, surgical, paediatric, psychiatric and subspecialty patient presentations can all be seen during the same working day. Investigation, diagnosis and management of these patients is often done with limited information and may involve rapid life preserving decisions to be made despite a level of diagnostic uncertainty.

    There is also the ability to sub-specialise within emergency medicine in many exciting fields such as:

    • toxicology
    • expedition medicine
    • hyperbaric medicine
    • retrieval
    • pre-hospital medicine.

    Doctors who are well suited to emergency medicine tend to be good at multi-tasking, decision-making and work well within teams. They have good communication skills and cope well within stressful environments and situations. They enjoy variety within their workload and enjoy a good puzzle as many emergency medicine patients are not clear cut diagnostically. Finally, they must be able to cope with the demands of shift work as weekend and afterhours work is the norm for the emergency medicine specialist.

    Specialty contacts 

    Australasian College of Emergency Medicine
    Website: acem.org.au

    The directors of emergency medicine training are always happy to be contacted by anyone interested in working in the emergency department or joining the training scheme: 

    Auckland City Hospital

    Bernard Foley
    Email: bernardf@adhb.govt.nz

    Gina De Cleene
    Email: ginadc@adhb.govt.nz 

    Middlemore Hospital

    Terri Prest
    Email: prestt@middlemore.co.nz

    Matthew Clarke
    Email: clarkem@middlemore.co.nz 

    North Shore Hospital

    Emma Batistich
    Email: emma.batistich@waitematadhb.govt.nz

    David Peak
    Email: david.peak@waitematadhb.govt.nz

    Emergency medicine factsheet

    Read more about emergency medicine at Northern Regional Alliance

    Workforce

    This is a relatively new specialty that is undergoing rapid growth. Nationally, the workload of the emergency services continues to increase, inevitably requiring an increase in staffing numbers all hours of the clock. Because of this increase, emergency medicine has experienced a surge in SMO numbers over recent years.

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand emergency medicine specialists talk about the reality of working within this field

    RMO Careers Fair

    The RMO Careers Fair was held at Auckland City Hospital on March 23 & 24, 2015.  Speakers on the Emergency Medicine panel were Dr David Peak, Dr Jeremy Dryden and Dr Louis Mason. Click the link below to view this session.

  • General practice

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    2017 RMO Careers Fair - General Practice training: A presentation by Drs Margaret Goodey, Kim Bannister, Yaw Moh and Nina Earles

    About general practice

    General practitioners are expert specialists in the overall physical and mental wellbeing of all New Zealanders.

    As a GP you have the power to make a real difference in communities. You will constantly be challenged by complex medical presentations and experience a wide range of clinical, ethical, legal and socio-cultural diversity.

    It is the medical specialty with great job satisfaction, variety, community involvement and flexibility. Every day is different and every day is inspiring.

    The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners website has more information. 

    Specialty contacts 

    The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners
    National Office
    PO Box 10 440
    Wellington
    Tel: 04 496 5972
    Fax: 04 496 5997
    Email: rnzcgp@rnzcgp.org.nz
    Website: rnzcgp.org.nz 

    Dr Kim Bannister - GP VTC Chair
    Email: kbannister@gmail.com

    Dr Margaret Goodey - GPEP1 liaison
    Email: m.goodey@vodafone.co.nz

    General practice factsheet

    Read more about general practice at Northern Regional Alliance

    Workforce

    In 2009, there were more than 4000 GP members of the college. About 2800 are Fellows of the College and therefore may be registered by the Medical Council of New Zealand in the vocational scope of general practice.

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    The pay is reasonable, although overheads can impact on earnings if you own a practice.

    New Zealand GPs talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Intensive care medicine

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    2017 Auckland region RMO Careers Fair

    Intensive Care training.  Speakers on the Intensive Care Medicine panel were Dr Janet Liang, recent past chair of the Auckland Regional Intensive Care Medicine Vocational Training Committee, Dr Andrew van der Poll and Dr Kaushik Nilakant

    About intensive care medicine

    Intensive care medicine includes the assessment, resuscitation and ongoing management of patients with life-threatening organ system failure. Work is not confined to the intensive care unit, since patients are usually admitted to the unit from the care of a primary team elsewhere within the hospital. Intensive care specialists are also frequently involved in transporting and assisting with the management of seriously ill patients who may not eventually end up in the intensive care unit.

    Specialty contacts

    Juliette Adlam - Administrative officer
    College of Intensive Care Medicine
    Tel: 04 499 1213
    Email: cicm@cicm.org.nz
    Website: cicm.org.au

    Dr Janet Liang - Intensive care specialist
    North Shore Hospital Auckland
    Tel: 09 489 0523
    Email: janet.liang@waitematadhb.govt.nz

    Dr Les Galler - Intensive care specialist
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 
    Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949, ext 7460
    Email: lesg@adhb.govt.nz

    Dr Peter Dzendrowskyj - Intensive care specialist
    Middlemore Hospital
    Private Bag 93 311 
    Otahuhu
    Auckland
    Tel: 09 276 0112
    Email: peter.dzendrowskyj@middlemore.co.nz

     Dr Fiona Miles - Intensive care specialist
    Starship Children’s Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 3074903
    Email: fionam@adhb.govt.nz 

    Training information

    General

    • All intensive care training is supervised by the College of Intensive Care Medicine (CICM).
    • It is possible to obtain an endorsement in paediatric intensive care by completing the training requirements and sitting the fellowship examination in that subspecialty.
    • Further information on training is available in the faculty publication Objectives of Training in Intensive Care and on the faculty website. 

    Entry requirements and application

    Applicants must be registered with the Medical Council of New Zealand and must have at least two years of postgraduate hospital experience, of which no more than six months can be in general practice or any combination of anaesthesia, intensive care or pain medicine. 

    Length of training

    Training lasts a minimum of six years. The programme is divided into three years of basic training and three years of advanced training: core intensive care training (two years), clinical anaesthesia (one year), clinical medicine (one year). 

    Examinations and milestones 

    • The College of Intensive Care Medicine administers the primary exam. Further information on the content and format of this exam can be found in the CICM website.
    • The CICM has its own primary examination, but this can be exempted if the applicant has a completed fellowship, from ANZCA, FRACP and ACEM.
    • The fellowship examination in intensive care consists of written exams (two short answer question papers) and oral exams (clinical discussions, a cross-table viva and an objective structured clinical exam). The oral exam consists of two patient-oriented cases, cross table vivas, equipment and communication stations.
    • There are various courses available in Australia and New Zealand for candidates preparing for the two exams.
    • The faculty also requires that trainees complete a formal research project. This can be undertaken at any stage during training but should be completed before the final advanced training year.
    • In-training assessments are performed twice each year to monitor each registrar’s progress.
    • Some FANZCA, FRACP or FACEM training can be accepted as basic ICU training. This is reviewed by the CICM censor. If the fellowship is completed and the primary exam exempted, the applicant needs to complete only advanced training, comprising 24 months of advanced ICU training, 12 months of anaesthesia and 12 months of medicine and the final ICU exam and a formal project (see above) to be awarded FCICM. If the fellowship in another specialty is not completed, the CICM primary exam is required before advanced training is entered. 

    Application procedures

    Application forms are available from the CICM website. Documentation of hospital rotations completed must be supplied. At the time of applying it would be worthwhile discussing your plans with an intensive care specialist (preferably a supervisor of training) who can advise on how best to plan your training programme. This is particularly important if dual training is being considered. 

    Posts available

    For the purposes of training the faculty recognises several categories of ICU, defined in terms of maximum number of months that would be recognised towards the ICM Fellowship (typically 24 months, 12 months and 6 months). The faculty requires that during fellowship training, half of the core ICU training period should be an unbroken 12 month period spent in one core training ICU. This definitely requires early discussion and planning with the ICU in question. Each of the New Zealand ICUs that offers 12‒24 months of recognised training has a limited number of registrar posts, many of which are filled by other specialty trainees (including those in anaesthesia, internal medicine, paediatrics and emergency medicine) who are gaining elective or compulsory ICU experience.  

    As at November 2014, the CICM accredits intensive care training undertaken at the following locations in New Zealand:

    Auckland

    • Auckland Hospital.
    • Middlemore Hospital.
    • Starship Hospital.
    • North Shore Hospital.

    Nationally

    • Christchurch Hospital.
    • Waikato Hospital.
    • Wellington Hospital.
    • Hawke's Bay Hospital. 

    Intensive care medicine factsheet

    Read Health Workforce New Zealand information about intensive care medicine

    Workplace

    Intensive care medicine is a very rewarding career. However, with the high number of intensive care trainees now completing ICU training and the limited number of specialist positions available worldwide, there is increasing demand for these limited specialist positions. For those undertaking dual training, the requirement to complete the demands of two specialties requires a high level of commitment and focus. It is important for any trainee considering this to discuss the expectations and requirements fully with a supervisor of training to ensure an appropriate program. In Auckland, the local CICM Vocational Training Committee also provides oversight, guidance and teaching to those seeking to undertake intensive care medicine as a career.

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    Although there is very little private ICU work available in New Zealand yet, Australia does offer a significant amount. Locum work is available in public ICUs.

    New Zealand intensive care specialists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Obstetrics and gynaecology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    2017 Auckland region RMO Careers Fair

    O&G training.  Speakers on the Obstetrics and Gynaecology panel are Drs Sarah Tout, Adele Barr, Rosalie Fergusson, Ernest Mavuso and Nicholas Walker.

    About obstetrics and gynaecology

    Although obstetrics and gynaecology are separate branches of medicine, they are usually merged into one service, incorporating pregnancy and infertility care and other gynaecology services. The obstetrician provides medical care before, during and after childbirth. Gynaecologists diagnose, treat and aid in the prevention of disorders of the female reproductive system.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on training programmes, see:
    Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG)
    College House
    254–260 Albert Street East Melbourne,
    Vic 3002 Australia
    Tel: 00 61 3 9417 1699
    Fax: 00 61 3 9419 0672  
    Email: ranzcog@ranzcog.edu.au
    Website: ranzcog.edu.au 

    AUCKLAND

    Sue Belgrave (WDHB) - O&G VTC Chair and Lead Training Supervisor
    Dr Mahesh Harilall (ADHB) - Lead Training Supervisor
    Jenny McDougall (ADHB) - Training Supervisor
    Sarah Tout (CMDHB) - RANZCOG Northern Training Co-ordinator/Lead Training Supervisor

    Jude Kaveney (RANZCOG Training co-ordinator
    )
    Email: jkaveney@ranzcog.org.nz 

    Obstetrics and gynaecology factsheet

    Read more about obstetrics and gynaecology at Northern Regional Alliance

    Workforce

    • There were about 160 active specialists in obstetrics and gynaecology in New Zealand in 2000. These numbers remained stable throughout the period 1994–2000.
    • The recommended specialist to population ratio (for women over the age of 15) is about 1:10,000. The current New Zealand ratio is about 1:9,500, so there is no shortfall at present.

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand obstetricians and gynaecologists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Paediatric and child health

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    Paediatrics - RMO Careers Fair 2018

    Hear about paediatric specialty training from the specialists and trainees themselves at the Auckland region RMO Careers Fair 2018

    About paediatrics and child health

    Paediatrics and child health is the specialty that deals with diseases and disorders of growth and development, from new-borns to young adults. Most paediatricians in New Zealand are generalists but there are opportunities to subspecialise (see training information).

    The role of the paediatrician is complex, since the work involves treating patients who may not be able to make decisions regarding their own health and may not understand the necessity for treatment. For these reasons, paediatricians must establish the trust of patients as well as their caregivers. Paediatric and child health services are administered in hospitals, in outpatient clinics and in the community. Auckland has two specialist stand-alone paediatric hospitals: Starship Children’s Hospital in Grafton and Kidz First Children’s Hospital in Otahuhu. There is also the Rangitira Unit at Waitakere Hospital.

    Training information

    Advanced training is offered in:

    Cardiology

    cardiology@racp.org.nz

    Clinical Genetics

    clinicalgenetics@racp.edu.au

    Clinical Pharmacology

    clinicalpharmacology@racp.edu.au

    Community Child Health

    communitychildhealth@racp.edu.au

    Dermatology

    dermatology@racp.org.nz

    Endocrinology

    endocrinology@racp.org.nz

    Gastroenterology

    gastroenterology@racp.org.nz

    General Paediatrics

    generalpaediatrics@racp.org.nz

    Haematology

    haematology@racp.org.nz

    Immunology / Allergy

    immunologyallergy@racp.org.nz

    Infectious Diseases

    infectiousdiseases@racp.org.nz

    Infectious Diseases & Microbiology

    idmicro@racp.edu.au

    Medical Oncology

    medicaloncology@racp.org.nz

    Neonatal / Perinatal Medicine

    neonatalperinatal@racp.edu.au

    Nephrology

    nephrology@racp.org.nz

    Neurology

    neurology@racp.org.nz

    Paediatric Emergency Medicine

    paedemergency@racp.edu.au

    Palliative Medicine

    palliativemedtraining@racp.edu.au

    Respiratory & Sleep Medicine

    respiratorysleep@racp.org.nz

    Rheumatology

    rheumatology@racp.org.nz

    Child & Adolescent Psychiatry*

    psychiatrydftp@racp.edu.au

    Applications for basic training should be sent to:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office
    PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Specialty contacts 

    Dr Simon Rowley (ADHB) Paediatrics VTC Chair and Director of Paediatric Training-ADHB (National Women's)
    Director of Paediatric Education
    Email: srowley@adhb.govt.nz

    Sharon Wong (WDHB) - Director of Paediatric Training-WDHB
    Raewyn Gavin (ADHB) - Director of Paediatric Training-ADHB (Starship)
    Ross Nicholson (CMDHB) - Director of Paediatric Training-CMDHB

    Postgraduate diploma contacts 

    University of Auckland – Diploma in paediatrics
    The Administrator
    Tel: 09 373 7599 x 891717
    Email: dippeads@auckland.ac.nz
    Website: auckland.ac.nz

    University of Otago – Diploma in child health
    Distance Learning Co-ordinator
    Dunedin School of Medicine
    P.O. Box 913, Dunedin
    Tel: 64 3 474 7825
    Email: medical-faculty@otago.ac.nz
    Website: otago.ac.nz

    Paediatric and child health factsheets

    Read more about Healthforce New Zealand information on paediatric and child health

    Read more about paediatric and child health at Northern Regional Alliance

    Workforce

    • There were about 218 active paediatric and child health specialists in New Zealand in 2010.
    • The recommended specialist to population ratio is 1:5,400. The current New Zealand ratio is about 1:5,566.
    • There is an undersupply of paediatric and child health specialists in some rural areas and in some subspecialties.

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    There is not much private practice in this field, so pay rates tend to be fairly low in comparison with those in other specialties.

    A New Zealand paediatrician talks about the reality of working within this field

  • Pain medicine

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About pain medicine

    Pain medicine is a multidisciplinary field of specialist medical practice which has only recently come of age. Severe persistent pain is now recognised as one of the most prevalent and most costly health care problems worldwide - it has major impact on (and significant financial consequences for) individuals, families and the community at large. The field spans the specialised management of severe problems in the three major areas of acute pain, chronic pain and pain related to cancer.

    Specialty contacts

    Faculty of Pain Medicine Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists
    630 St Kilda Road Melbourne,
    Vic 3004 Australia
    Tel: 00 61 3 9510 6299
    Fax: 00 61 3 9510 6786
    Email: painmed@anzca.edu.au
    Website: fpm.anzca.edu.au

    Dr Kieran Davis - Clinical Director
    The Auckland Regional Pain Service
    Auckland Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949
    Email: kierand@adhb.govt.nz

    Pain medicine factsheet

    Read Health Work New Zealand information on pain medicine

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    There is substantial demand for specialist opinion in the medico-legal field and this work tends to be well remunerated.

    New Zealand pain specialists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Pathology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    2017 Auckland region RMO Careers Fair

    Pathology training programme: A presentation by Dr Mike Watson and Dr Simeon Barker

    About pathology

    Pathology is the branch of medicine involved in understanding causes and processes of disease. Pathology encompasses the following disciplines; anatomical pathology, chemical pathology, haematology, immunology, laboratory genetics, and microbiology/ virology. Investigations are made by performing tests on various tissues including blood and other body fluids, and samples taken during surgery or as part of a medical examination. Pathologists interpret the results of these tests, which may show the cause or severity of illness or may be used to monitor treatment once diagnosis has been made.

    Specialty contacts

    The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia
    Durham Hall
    207 Albion Street
    Surry Hills, NSW 2010 Australia
    Tel: 00 61 2 8356 5858
    Fax: 00 61 2 8356 5828
    Email: boc@rcpa.edu.au
    Website: rcpa.edu.au 

    Dr Mike Watson - Chair, Vocational Training Committee
    Training Programme
    Private Bag 92024, Auckland
    Tel: 09 367 0000
    Email: mwatson@adhb.govt.nz 

    Dr Alan King - Chair, Vocational Training Committee
    Department of Pathology Middlemore Hospital
    Private Bag 93 311 Otahuhu Auckland
    Tel: 09 276 0154
    Email: aking@middlemore.co.nz 

    Sub-Specialties

    Dr George Chan - Haematology
    3rd Floor, Auckland Hospital
    Private Bag 92024, Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949
    Fax: 09 375 4321
    Email: georgec@adhb.govt.nz

    Dr Mike Watson - Histopathology
    Auckland DHB
    Private Bag 92024, Auckland
    Tel: 09 367 0000
    Email: mwatson@adhb.govt.nz

    Dr Sally Roberts - Microbiology, Immunology, Virology
    Laboratory Services
    Auckland DHB
    Private Bag 92024, Auckland
    Tel: 09 630 9785
    Email: sallyrob@adhb.govt.nz

    Dr Don Love - Laboratory Genetics
    Auckland DHB
    Private Bag 92024, Auckland
    Tel: 09 367 0000
    Email: donaldl@adhb.govt.nz

    Pathology factsheet

    Read Health Workforce New Zealand information on pathology

    Workforce

    • There were 218 pathologists active in New Zealand in 2001, of whom 29% were female. There are currently 51 trainees in pathology in New Zealand, of whom 59% are female.
    • Specialists include: 44% anatomical pathologists, 7% chemical pathologists, 8% general pathologists, 22% haematologists, 11% microbiologists and 8% other (Workforce analysis: Pathologists in New Zealand 2001, RCPA, 62).
    • Numbers were stable between 1994‒2000, but there was a significant increase in workload over that period.
    • There is no agreed specialist to population ratio but this field is seriously undersupplied, particularly in the subspecialties of anatomical pathology and cytopathology (The health workforce: A training programme analysis, CTA, 2001, 53-55).

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    Pathology is not highly paid in comparison with some specialties but the hours are relatively good.

    New Zealand pathologists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Psychiatry

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    Psychiatry - RMO Careers Fair 2018

    Hear about psychiatry specialty training from the specialists and trainees themselves at the Auckland region RMO Careers Fair 2018

    About psychiatry

    Psychiatry is a branch of medicine specialising in the prevention and treatment of mental disorder and the promotion of mental health in the community. By virtue of their specialist training psychiatrists bring a comprehensive and integrated bio-psychosocial approach to the diagnosis, assessment, treatment and prevention of psychiatric disorder and mental health problems.

    Psychiatrists treat patients and work with the patient’s general practitioner and other primary health care providers, families and carers of patients and the general community. The work of psychiatrists includes the prevention, management, and relief of suffering caused by a range of developmental, emotional, behavioural and cognitive disorders.

    Specialty contacts

    Auckland Regional Psychiatric Registrar Training Programme
    Website: psychtraining.org.

    Auckland      

    For enquiries about the Auckland programme:

    Dr Felicity Plunkett 
    Auckland Regional Psychiatric Registrar training centre
    Level 6, Building 14
    Greenlane Clinical Centre
    Private Bag 92189
    Greenlane, Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949 Ext 26545
    Fax: 09 638 0344
    E-mail c/o Rosalynn Williams, Administrator: rosalynnw@adhb.govt.nz
    Email: felicityp@adhb.govt.nz         

    Registrar training posts
    aucklanddoctors.co.nz
    The main intake is in December, with applications for interviews being received by NoRTH in June and July.
    There is a much smaller intake in June of each year.

    For details of the other training programmes around NZ, contact the RANZCP NZ National Office:
    RANZCP
    PO Box 10-669
    Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 7247
    Fax: 04 472 7246
    Email:  nzoffice@ranzcp.co.nz
    Website: ranzcp.org

    Applications should be sent to:

    Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
    National Office
    PO Box 10-669 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 7247
    Fax: 04 472 7246
    Email: nzoffice@ranzcp.co.nz

    Psychiatry factsheet

    Read more about psychiatry at Northern Regional Alliance

    Workforce

    • In 2003 there were 302 psychiatrists holding annual practising certificates for that year (ratio 1:13,000).
    • There is still an overall workforce shortage of psychiatrists, especially in some subspecialties such as child and adolescent psychiatry.

    Being a consultant psychiatrist is an important and necessary job, with secure career prospects.
    Source: Clinical Training Agency Strategic Intentions document 2004 – 2013.

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand psychiatrists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Public health medicine

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    Public Health training Programme - 2016 Auckland region RMO Careers Fair

    A presentation by Dr Doone Winnard and Dr Peter Sandiford, Public Health Physicians and Dr Carol Barker, Public Health Registrar.

    About public health medicine

    Public health is commonly defined as ‘the organised efforts made by society to prevent disease, promote health and prolong the life of the population (R. Beaglehole: ‘Prospects for Public Health in New Zealand’, New Zealand Medical Journal, 105,1992, 29–31)

    Public health medicine is defined as "that branch of medical practice which is primarily concerned with the health and care of populations. It is concerned with the promotion of health and the prevention of disease, with the assessment of a community’s health needs and with the provision of services to communities in general and to specific groups within them". ( Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine. Advanced Training Handbook. Sydney: AFPHM, 2004).

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on training programmes:

    New Zealand College of Public Health Medicine
    Sarah Targett - Senior Executive Officer, New Zealand College of Public Health Medicine
    PO Box 10 233 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 9183
    Email: admin@nzcphm.og.nz

    Website for training and working in New Zealand: nzcphm.org.nz

    Mr Bruce R. Smith - Faculty Manager, Faculty of Medicine, University of Otago
    Email: medical-faculty@otago.ac.nz
    Website: www.otago.ac.nzl

    Public health factsheet

    Read more about Health Workforce New Zealand information on public health

    Workforce

    • In 2014, there were about 200 Public Health Medicine professionals in New Zealand, making up 3.6% of the total medical workforce. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    Salaries are not very high in comparison with those in clinical medicine, especially if you are working in a university setting. During basic training, trainees are provided with a non-taxable study grant of $42,000. During advanced training, each trainee enters into an employment contract with the training site employer and there is no standardised salary level, although it would usually be similar to the RMO pay scale for a 40-hour week.

    New Zealand public health specialists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Radiation oncology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    2017 Auckland region RMO Careers Fair

    Radiation Oncology training:  Speakers on the Radiation Oncology panel are Dr John Matthews, senior Radiation Oncologist and Dr Vikash Patel, Registrar in training. Click the link below to view this session.

    About radiation oncology

    Radiation oncologists care for cancer patients and provide treatment through radiation therapy. Radiation oncologists work in a multidisciplinary environment with many other health care professionals including surgeons, medical oncologists, palliative care physicians, radiation therapists and medical radiation physicists. It involves direct patient care and exciting technological developments.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on training programmes:
    The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists
    PO Box 10 424 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6470
    Fax: 04 472 6474 
    Email: nzbranch@ranzcr.org.nz
    Website: ranzcr.edu.au

    Dr Hedley Krawitz - Director of Training Radiation Oncology
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949
    Email: hedleyk@adhb.govt.nz

    Radiation oncology factsheet

    Read more about Health Workforce New Zealand information on radiation oncology

    Workforce

    • There are 49 radiation oncology specialists active in New Zealand in 2014.

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    Remuneration rates are comparable with those in other medical specialties and there is scope to undertake some private practice in this field.

    New Zealand radiation oncologists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Radiology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    Radiology - RMO Careers Fair 2018

    Hear about radiology specialty training from the specialists and trainees themselves at the Auckland region RMO Careers Fair 2018

    About radiology

    The radiologist is an expert in diagnosis through reviewing images such as x-ray, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computerised tomography (CT). Radiologists advise doctors on the best examination for a patient, in some cases explaining the process to the patient and supervise the examination. They also interpret the results of the examination. In addition, radiologists may treat some diseases guided by imaging equipment. Using diagnostic radiology in therapeutic intervention is becoming more common as technology advances. Initiatives such as breast screening have increased the workload of radiologists in New Zealand in the past few years. (The Health Workforce: A Training Programme Analysis, CTA, 2001, 85).

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on training programmes:
    The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists
    PO Box 10 424 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6470
    Fax: 04 472 6474
    Email: nzbranch@ranzcr.org.nz
    Website: ranzcr.edu.au

    Sonja Bastin (ADHB) - Radiology VTC Chair and Director/Supervisor of training at ADHB
    Graeme Anderson (CMDHB) - Supervisor/Director of Training
    Penny Symes (WDHB) - Supervisor/Director of Training

    Applications should be sent to:

    Gail Le Claire – Executive officer
    New Zealand branch office
    The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists
    PO Box 10 424 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6470
    Fax: 04 472 6474
    Email: nzbranch@ranzcr.org.nz
    Website: ranzcr.edu.au

    Radiology factsheet

    Read more about Health Workforce New Zealand information on diagnostic and interventional radiology

    Read more about radiology at Northern Regional Alliance

    Workforce

    The role of the radiologist is expanding and demand for services is increasing.

    • There were about 200 radiology specialists active in New Zealand in 2000, representing a growth of 21% in the period 1994–2000.
    • The recommended specialist to population ratio is 1:16,000; the current New Zealand ratio is 1:19,000.
    • There is inequitable distribution throughout the country, with significant shortages in Waikato and Otago/Southland (The health workforce: A training programme analysis, CTA, 2001, 85-88).

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    The income increases if you undertake private practice.

    New Zealand radiologists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Sports medicine

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About sports medicine

    Sports medicine involves the practice of medicine as it is applied to all aspects of physical activity.

    Specialty information

    For up-to-date information on training programmes:
    The Australasian College of Sports Physicians
    Christine de Villeneuve
    Suite 30, Level 6 
    193 Macquarie St Sydney NSW 2000
    Tel: +61 2 9223-4055
    Fax: +61 2 9223-4066
    Email: office@acsp.org.au
    Website: acsp.org.au/

    Dr Chris Hanna - New Zealand Training Coordinator, ACSP
    Tel: 09 521 9811
    Email: c.hanna@sportsmed.net.nz

    Workforce

    • At the end of 2006 there were 13 qualified sports physicians in New Zealand and six registrars in training.
    • The current specialist to population ratio is 1:250,000. While the specialty is still relatively new, it is estimated that an appropriate ratio would be around 1:150,000. 

    Income

    Contact the Australasian College of Sports Physicians.

    New Zealand sports medicine specialists talk about the reality of working within this field

Adult medicine

  • Cardiology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About cardiology

    Cardiology is the branch of internal medicine concerned with diseases of the cardiovascular system. Work in the specialty involves aspects of prevention, investigation, treatment and research. Subspecialty interests include congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, ischaemic heart disease, electrophysiology, clinical cardiology, interventional cardiology, transplantation, nuclear cardiology, echocardiology, epidemiology and cardiovascular research.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    The Cardiac Society of Australia And New Zealand
    PO Box 10601, Wellington
    Tel: 04 460 8121
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Website: csanz.edu.au

    Auckland

    Dr Tony Scott - Cardiologist
    Chairman Regional Advanced Training in Cardiology Committee
    North Shore Hospital
    Auckland
    Email: tony.scott@waitematadhb.govt.nz

    Dr Peter Ruygrok - Cardiologist
    Green Lane Cardiovascular Service
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92024, Auckland
    Email:pruygrok@adhb.govt.nz 

    Cardiology factsheet

    Read more about cardiology
    Health Workforce New Zealand 

    Workforce

    In 2014, there were over 100 cardiologists active in New Zealand. Cardiologists make up the single largest medical subspecialty group after general internal medicine. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement 
    Consultant in the private sector: $250,000-$500,000.
    Individual salaries within these ranges are affected by call rosters, seniority, procedural skills and areas of interest.

    New Zealand cardiology specialists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Clinical genetics

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About clinical genetics

    Clinical genetics involves diagnosis, investigation, management, counselling and education of people with (or at risk of) genetic or inherited disorders. The specialty covers a wide range of areas including cancer genetics, neurogenetics, pre-symptomatic diagnosis of adult-onset conditions, clinical cytogenetic problems, prenatal diagnosis, and diagnosis and management of inborn errors of metabolism and syndromes.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Auckland

    Julie Arnold ? Clinical Director
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949, ext 25870
    Freephone: 0800 476 123
    Email: gensec@adhb.govt.nz

    Dr Callum Wilson
    c/o National Testing Centre
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private bag 92024
    Email: callumw@adhb.govt.nz

    Wellington

    Dr Joanne Dixon
    Central Regional Genetic Service
    Wellington Hospital
    Private Bag 7902 Wellington South
    Tel: 04 385 5310
    Fax: 04 385 5822
    Email: joanne.dixon@ccdhb.org.nz

    Clinical genetics factsheet

    Read more about clinical genetics
    Health workforce New Zealand. 

    Workforce

    No specialist workforce projections are available, but there were fewer than four active clinical geneticists in New Zealand in 2000 (The health workforce: A training programme analysis, CTA, 2001,63). 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    Individual salaries within these ranges are affected by call rosters, seniority, procedural skills and areas of interest.

    Clinical genetics is less lucrative than many interventional specialties and offers only limited scope for private practice.

    New Zealand clinical geneticists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Clinical pharmacology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About clinical pharmacology

    Clinical pharmacology is the scientific discipline that involves the relationship between drugs and humans. Drugs are the main therapeutic tools of physicians and hence clinical pharmacology is a core skill for all physicians. Formal training in clinical pharmacology encompasses all aspects of safe, effective and rational use of medicines applied at individual, group and population levels.

    Clinical pharmacologists work toward rational, evidence-based, cost-effective use of drugs in four domains:

    • Clinical medicine ? clinical consultation, clinical toxicology, therapeutic drug monitoring, pharmacogenetics, and often hospital practice in a second specialty.
    • Policy and governance ? including drug regulation, serving on national and local committees.
    • Research ? both within the discipline and in supporting and advising other disciplines on research related to medicines.
    • Education ? undergraduate and post-graduate.

    Advanced training in clinical pharmacology is well suited to dual training and most clinical pharmacologists in Australasia have trained in a second specialty. Research is integral to the discipline and a research degree is encouraged as part of Advanced training in clinical pharmacology. Training is not confined to hospitals for example, it may include time in universities, pathology laboratories, regulatory bodies or the pharmaceutical industry.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Prof Matt Doogue
    Department of Clinical Pharmacology
    Christchurch Hospital
    PO Box 4710 Christchurch
    Tel: 03 364 1055
    Fax: 03 364 1003
    Email: matt.doogue@cdhb.health.nz

    Workforce

    There are currently 7 clinical pharmacologists active in New Zealand. The long term rate of new positions is approximately four per decade. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement
    There is some scope for private consultancy work within the pharmaceutical industry.

    New Zealand clinical pharmacologists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Dermatology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About dermatology

    Dermatology is the study and treatment of diseases of the skin. Dermatologists provide services mainly in an outpatient setting and treat patients of all ages.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Dr Denesh Patel ? Dermatologist
    Greenlane Clinical Centre
    Private Bag 92 189 Auckland
    Tel: 09 630 9943, ext 26531
    Email: glderm@adhb.govt.nz

    Dermatology factsheet

    Read more about dermatology
    Health workforce New Zealand.

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement
    There is considerable scope for private work in this specialty. 

    New Zealand dermatologists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Endocrinology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About endocrinology

    Endocrinology deals with disorders of the endocrine system and involves consultation, testing, diagnosis and treatment. Conditions include:

    • diabetes and its complications
    • thyroid, pituitary and adrenal disease
    • gonadal disorders and infertility
    • neuroendocrine conditions
    • benign and malignant glandular tumours
    • disorders of growth
    • genetic and congenital glandular dysfunction
    • lipid and nutritional abnormalities
    • menopausal disorders
    • osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease.

    Specialty contacts 

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Dr Stella Milsom
    Chair, Specialist Advisory Committee Endocrinology RACP NZ
    Email:s.milsom@auckland.ac.nz 

    Dr Simon Young
    Chairman, Specialist Training Committee RACP
    Email: Simon.Young@waitematadhb.govt.nz 

    Dr Carl Eagleton
    NZ Endocrine Society
    Email: Carl.Eagleton@middlemore.co.nz

    Dr Steven Assinder – Department of Anatomy
    University of Otago
    Email: stephen.assinder@stonebow.otago.ac.uk

    Dr Robyn Toomath – Department of Endocrinology
    Wellington Hospital
    Private Bag 7902 Wellington South
    Tel: 04 385 5999
    Fax: 04 385 5819

    New Zealand has combined training in endocrine and diabetes:

    • Auckland (3 endocrinology, 1 diabetes). 
    • Waikato (2 endocrinology, 1 diabetes).
    • Wellington (2 endocrinology/diabetes).
    • Christchurch (2 endocrinology, 1 diabetes).
    • Dunedin (1 endocrinology/diabetes).

    Auckland appointments are via a competitive interview process conducted by the ARCET committee annually.
    The College Specialist Advisory Committee encourages trainees to train in more than one site if possible, and prefers trainees to do their core endocrine training early.

    Trainees are encouraged to join the:
    New Zealand Society of Endocrinology
    Website:nzse.science.org.nz

    New Zealand Society for the Study of 
    Website: nzssd.org.nz 

    Endocrinology factsheet

    Read more about endocrinology
    Health workforce New Zealand. 

    Workforce

    In 2014 there were approximately 59 endocrinologists in New Zealand. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement
    For a consultant in private practice might gross $380-$420 per hour.

    New Zealand endocrinologist talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Gastroenterology and hepatology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About gastroenterology and hepatology

    Gastroenterology deals with all organs of the digestive system, from entry to exit. It covers diseases of the gastro-intestinal tract and includes the associated fields of pancreatobiliary disease and hepatology. Gastroenterology involves inpatient care, outpatient clinics and diagnostic procedures including upper and lower gastro-intestinal endoscopy. Hepatology deals with diseases of the liver including management of patients with acute and chronic liver failure.  You may be involved in the assessment and management of patients with end stage liver disease who are candidates for, or have, received liver transplants.

    Many hospitals employ gastroenterologists in the role of a combined gastroenterologist and general physician.

    Specialty contacts 

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Specialty Societies Executive Officer
    The Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    4th Floor, 99 The Terrace, Wellington 6011
    P.O. Box 10 601 Wellington 6143
    Tel: +64 4 460 8121 
    Fax: +64 4 472 6718
    Email: societies@racp.org.nz

    Auckland

    Dr David Rowbotham – Clinical Director
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Mobile: 021 492 334
    Email: davidrb@adhb.govt.nz

    Associate Professor Mark Lane
    Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 379 7440, ext 7409
    Email: mark@adhb.govt.nz

    Associate Professor Ed Gane
    New Zealand Liver Transplant Unit
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 370 4949, ext 6560
    Mobile: 021 548 371
    Fax: 09 375 4345
    Email: edgane@adhb.govt.nz 

    Gastroenterology and hepatology factsheet

    Read more about gastroenterology and hepatology
    Health workforce New Zealand. 

    Workforce

    In 2014, there were 78 specialists in gastroenterology and hepatology active in New Zealand. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement
    There is scope for private sector work in this speciality.

    New Zealand gastroenterologists and hepatologists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • General medicine

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    Physician Training - 2019 Auckland region RMO Careers Fair

    Physician training Programme.  A presentation by Dr Peter Storey, Chair of the Adult Medicine Vocational Training Committee talks about physician training, Dr Cheryl Johnson, Director Physician Education and Dr Matthew Broom, a registrar in the physician training programme.

    About general medicine

    A general medicine doctor diagnoses and manages the complex medical problems of adolescent and adult patients. General medicine doctors may carry out various technical procedures to assist in the diagnosis or treatment of illness, and may develop an interest in a particular field of general medicine. Advanced training is available in several subspecialty areas including general medicine itself.

    General physicians have a wide range of knowledge and experience, making them well suited to providing high quality specialist services across a spectrum of health and illness that is not limited by the boundaries of medical subspecialties. They deal with colleagues in many disciplines including general practice, surgery and psychiatry.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Internal Medicine Society of Australia and New Zealand (IMSANZ)
    145 Macquarie Street Sydney, NSW 2000 Australia
    Tel: 00 61 2 9256 5471
    Fax: 00 61 2 9252 3310
    Email: imsanz@racp.edu.au 

    Auckland Region Hospitals’ Directors of Basic Physician Training
    Dr Cheryl Johnson (WDHB) Adult Medicine Vocational Training Committee Chair/Director of Physician Education
    Dr Boris Lowe (ADHB) Director of Physician Training
    Dr Stuart Jones (CMDHB) Director of Physician Training 

    Workforce

    • There were 509 specialists working in general medicine in New Zealand in 2000, reflecting a steady growth in numbers since 1994.
    • The specialist to population ratio for general medicine in 2000 was 1:25,371.
    • There is great need for more generalists in medicine and it is estimated that there are vacancies for 50 general physicians nationwide. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand general medicine specialist talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Geriatric medicine

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About geriatric medicine

    Geriatric medicine deals with the clinical, social, preventative, remedial and rehabilitative aspects of health and illness in older people. The specialty is broad-based and places particular emphasis on the provision of community-based care and services, and on the treatment of frail, elderly people with multiple problems. Geriatricians assess disabilities in older people and devise appropriate case management plans. The specialty typically adopts a multidisciplinary approach and offers considerable scope for research activities.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Dr Tracey McMillan – Geriatrician
    Auckland City Hospital
    Tel: 09 307 4949, ext 22980
    Email: TMcMillan@adhb.govt.nz

    Dr Joe Singh – Geriatrician
    North Shore Hospital
    Tel: 09 486 1491 ext 2816
    Email: Jose.Singh@waitematadhb.govt.nz

    Dr Hla San Tha – Geriatrician
    Middlemore Hospital
    Tel: 09 276 0044
    Email: HlaSan.Tha@middlemore.co.nz 

    Geriatric medicine factsheet

    Read more about geriatric medicine
    Health workforce New Zealand 

    Workforce

    • In 2005, there were 61 specialists in geriatric medicine active in New Zealand, 28 based in Auckland.
    • In New Zealand, the geriatric medicine specialist to population ratio in 2001 was 1:91,214 (The health workforce: A training programme analysis, CTA, 2001, 63).
    • There are several vacancies in the Auckland region as well as in many parts of urban and rural New Zealand.  Some of these positions suit those also trained in general medicine. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement
    There is scope in this specialty for private practice.

    New Zealand geriatricians talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Haematology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About haematology

    Haematology is an integrated discipline that incorporates clinical and laboratory aspects of diseases of the blood. It deals with:

    • laboratory diagnosis of blood films
    • bone marrow and coagulation tests
    • clinical care of malignant conditions (leukaemia, lymphoma, lymphoproliferative)
    • non-malignant conditions (anaemia, bleeding and clotting disorders)
    • Bone marrow transplantation
    • blood transfusion medicine

    Specialty contacts 

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia
    Durham Hall 207 Albion Street Surrey Hills
    NSW 2010 Australia
    Tel: 00 61 2 8356 5858
    Fax: 00 61 2 8356 5828
    Email: boc@rcpa.edu.au
    Website: rcpa.edu.au

    Dr Richard Doocey – Clinical Director
    Haematology Auckland Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 379 7440
    Email: RDoocey@adhb.govt.nz

    Haematology factsheet

    Read more about haematology
    Health workforce New Zealand. 

    Workforce

    • In 2000 there were 21 specialists in haematology active in New Zealand, representing a specialist to population ratio of 1:182,429 (The health workforce: A training programme analysis, CTA, 63). 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand haematologist talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Immunology and allergy

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About immunology and allergy

    Clinical immunology and allergy is concerned with diagnosing and treating patients with disorders that affect the immune system. Allergy concerns the diagnosis and management of patients with allergic disorder.  Immunopathology is an extension component of the specialty and requires training in laboratory medicine.

    Specialty contacts 

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia
    Durham Hall 207 Albion Street Surrey Hills
    NSW 2010 Australia
    Tel: 00 61 2 8356 5858
    Fax: 00 61 2 8356 5828
    Email: boc@rcpa.edu.au
    Website: rcpa.edu.au 

    AUCKLAND

    Dr Jan Sinclair – JSAC Chair
    Paediatric Immunologist
    Starship Hospital
    Email: JanS@adhb.govt.nz

    Assoc Prof Rohan Ameratunga –
    Immunology and Allergy Specialist
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949, ext 6113
    Email: rohana@adhb.govt.nz

    Dr Penny Fitzharris –
    Clinical Director, Immunology
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949, ext 22970
    Email: pennyf@adhb.govt.nz 

    WELLINGTON

    Dr Richard Steele
    E-mail: Richard.Steele@ccdhb.org.nz 

    CHRISTCHURCH

    Dr John O'Donnell
    E-mail: John.ODonnell@cdhb.health.nz 

    Immunology and allergy factsheet

    Read more about immunology and allergy
    Health workforce New Zealand. 

    Workforce

    • In 2014, there were approximately 8 hospital-based specialists in immunology and allergy and two immunopathology specialists in New Zealand.
    • There are also a small number of private-only practitioners.
    • The number of specialists is considerably less than in Australia and the United States.  There is great demand for clinical services in cities outside Auckland. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement
    There is considerable scope for private practice.

    New Zealand immunologists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Infectious diseases

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About infectious disease medicine

    Infectious disease doctors care for adult patients who have infectious diseases sufficiently severe or rare as to require expert knowledge. The specialty incorporates clinical, laboratory and public health aspects of infectious disease medicine and microbiology.
    Areas of training include:

    • HIV-related disease and sexually transmitted diseases
    • general infectious diseases in hospitalised patients (including infections in surgical patients and those in intensive care)
    • infections in patients immunosuppressed for transplantation or by cancer and its treatment
    • tropical, travel and geographic medicine
    • infection control
    • immunisation.

    Other relevant areas include infection in pregnancy, antibiotic resistance, virology, mycology and parasitology.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Most ID physicians also belong to the Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases
    asid.net.au 

    Dr Rupert Handy – Clinical Director
    Infectious Diseases
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949, ext 22973
    Email: rupert@adhb.govt.nz

    Dr Nigel Raymond – Infectious Diseases & General Physician
    Clinical Leader, Infectious Diseases Department
    Level 6, GNB, Wellington Hospital
    Tel: 04 385 5999
    Email: Nigel.Raymond@ccdhb.org.nz

    Infectious diseases factsheet

    Read more about infectious diseases
    Health workforce New Zealand. 

    Workforce

    In 2014, there were approximately 30 infectious disease physicians active in New Zealand. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement
    Work is almost exclusively undertaken in the public sector and there is very little scope for private practice.

    New Zealand infectious disease specialists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Medical oncology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About medical oncology

    Medical oncologists are physicians with specialised skills in the medical management of patients with malignant disease. The role of the medical oncologist is to improve and extend as far as possible the quality and length of their patients’ lives. This is usually best achieved through a multidisciplinary approach – medical oncologists therefore work closely with other specialists, particularly surgeons, pathologists, radiologists and radiation oncologists

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Dr David Porter – Medical Oncologist
    Auckland Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949, ext 5457
    Email: dporter@adhb.govt.nz

    Dr Vernon Harvey – Medical Oncologist
    Auckland Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949, ext 6265
    Email: vernonh@adhb.govt.nz 

    Medical oncology factsheet

    Read more about medical oncology
    Health workforce New Zealand. 

    Workforce

    • In 2000 there were 17 specialists in medical oncology active in New Zealand, representing a specialist to population ratio of 1:225,353 (The health workforce: A training programmed analysis, CTA, 2001, 63).
    • In 2005, this number has increased to 36 specialists. Modelling has shown that the ratio of 1:100,000 is about right, although this may change as practices change. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand medical oncologists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Nephrology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About nephrology

    Nephrology deals with the diagnosis and management of patients with kidney disease and related disorders including:

    • immune-mediated disease
    • disorders of fluids and electrolytes
    • complex hypertension
    • urinary tract diseases
    • acute and chronic renal failure
    • dialysis
    • transplantation.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology
    145 Macquarie Street Sydney
    NSW 2000 Australia
    Tel: +61 2 9256 5461
    Fax: +61 2 9241 4083
    Email: anzsn@racp.edu.au
    Website: nephrology.edu.au

    Dr Ian Dittmer – Clinical Director Renal Medicine
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 379 7740
    Fax: 09 307 4987
    Email: ian.dittmer@adhb.govt.nz

    Dr Joanna Dunlop – Chair, Nephrology Specialist Advisory committee, RACP
    Tel: 09 276 0000
    Email: Joanna.Dunlop@middlemore.co.nz

    Dr Murray Leikis – Clinical Leader Renal Service
    Wellington Hospital
    PO Box 7343
    Wellington
    Tel: 04 806 0634
    Email: murray.leikis@ccdhb.org.nz 

    Nephrology factsheet

    Read more about nephrology
    Health workforce New Zealand. 

    Workforce

    In 2014, there were approximately 60 nephrologists active in New Zealand in full or part-time practice. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement
    Most renal specialists are full time hospital employees. Private practice is limited to consultation at present and accounts for 1-2/10 per physician at most.

    New Zealand nephrologists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Neurology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About neurology

    Neurology includes the science, investigation and treatment of all inherited and acquired diseases affecting the nervous and neuromuscular systems. This means that there is tremendous variety in the work of a general neurologist. Common conditions treated include headache, epilepsy and stroke but there are an enormous number of rare diseases that make neurology a challenging but fascinating specialty.

    More recently, developments in neuroscience have led to an increasing ability to treat and manage neurology conditions.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    The Secretariat – Australian Association of Neurologists
    145 Macquarie Street
    Sydney, NSW 2000
    Tel: 02 9256 5443
    Fax: 02 9241 4083
    Email: anzan@anzan.org.au
    Website: anzan.org.au 

    Dr David Hutchinson – Clinical Director of Neurology
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Email: dhutch@adhb.govt.nz

    Dr Alan Barber – Chair, SAC in Neurology Department of Neurology
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92024
    Auckland Mail Centre, Auckland 1142
    Email: a.barber@adhb.govt.nz 

    Neurology factsheet

    Read more about Health Workforce New Zealand information on neurology

    Workforce

    In 2014, there were about 40 active neurologists in New Zealand. This number is expected to continue to increase with increasing management opportunities and the development of stroke units. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    The level of remuneration for private practice consultation is comparable with that in other medical subspecialties.

    New Zealand neurologists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Nuclear medicine

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About nuclear medicine

    Nuclear medicine uses unsealed sources of radioactivity for diagnosis and treatment. Approximately 90% of the work involves diagnostic imaging. The images provide information that indicates organ function rather than structure. Studies cover patients from many different specialties – e.g. a bone scan may be requested by the departments of oncology, orthopaedics, general medicine, surgery or paediatrics. The range of available scans is expanding with the introduction of new equipment and new chemical tracers.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists
    New Zealand branch office
    PO Box 10 424 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6470
    Fax: 04 472 6474
    Email: nzbranch@ranzcr.org.nz
    Website: ranzcr.edu.au

    Dr Mike Rutland – Nuclear Medicine Specialist
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949, ext 7609
    Email: mrutland@adhb.govt.nz 

    Nuclear medicine factsheet

    Read more about nuclear medicine
    Health workforce New Zealand. 

    Workforce

    In 2000 there were five specialists in nuclear medicine active in New Zealand, representing a specialist to population ratio of 1:766,200 (The health workforce: A training programme analysis, CTA, 2001, 63). 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement
    Public sector salaries are usually those of the basic contract with small amounts of on-call and overtime. The private sector currently supports one nuclear medicine specialist and provides "top-up" work and some income for half of the specialists in the public sector (plus a few radiologists).

    New Zealand nuclear medicine specialists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Occupational medicine

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About occupational medicine

    Occupational medicine is concerned with the relationship between health and work and has preventive, clinical and population-based aspects. The role of the occupational physician is to ensure effective prevention of illness and injury arising in the workplace or as a result of work duties. Where prevention has not been successful, occupational physicians manage the appropriate rehabilitation of patients and facilitate their return to work. Occupational physicians also assist people who have illness or disability unrelated to work but whose workplace or work duties may require appropriate adjustment.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Dr Tony Chew – Consultant Occupational Physician
    Ground Floor Building 11
    Greenlane Clinical Centre
    Tel: 09 307 4949 ext 7034
    Email: tchew@adhb.govt.nz 

    Workforce

    • There are few occupational physicians in New Zealand and plenty of opportunities exist here and in Australia.
    • There is unlikely to be an oversupply within the next five or ten years.
    • Companies in more remote parts of New Zealand currently experience considerable difficulty in recruiting suitably trained doctors. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand occupational medicine specialists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Palliative medicine

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About palliative medicine

    Palliative medicine is the study and management of patients with life-limiting and life-threatening conditions who may have a limited prognosis and for whom the focus of care is often quality of life. Palliative medicine involves comprehensive symptom management and support of individuals with life-threatening illnesses along with support of their families, including through the bereavement period. The support involves the control of pain, other symptoms and psychological, social and spiritual support.

    Palliative medicine requires excellent clinical skills as it involves the care of patients across all specialities, with increasing emphasis on those with non-malignant illness. It also requires advanced communication skills, with training in this area being provided through the training programme.

    Entry to specialist training in palliative medicine is via FRACP Part 1 or through a GP fellowship (some other fellowships may also be considered as entry to training).

    Specialist training takes three years (depending on exemptions). Six month training posts are also available in the Auckland region for those training in other speciality areas but wishing to enhance their palliative care skills

    Specialty contacts 

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Dr Anne O'Callaghan – Clinical Director Auckland City Hospital Palliative Care Service,
    Chair Northern Region Palliative Medicine subcommittee of the Medicine Vocational Training Committee,
    Chair of the Palliative Medicine Training and Co-ordination Committee
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: (09) 307 4949
    Email: anneo@adhb.govt.nz

    Dr Simon Allan – Chair, Palliative Medicine Education Committee (PMEC)
    Tel: (06) 356 9169
    Email: Simon.Allan@midcentraldhb.govt.nz / simon.a@arohanuihospice.org.nz 

    Palliative medicine factsheet

    Read more about palliative medicine
    Health workforce New Zealand. 

    Workforce

    Palliative Medicine is the most at risk specialty in New Zealand (HWNZ) and therefore training and job prospects are good.

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand palliative medicine specialists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Rehabilitation medicine

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About rehabilitation medicine

    Rehabilitation medicine is concerned with the assessment and ongoing management of activity limitations (disability) and participation restrictions (handicap) arising from illness and injury. The specialty includes all aspects of clinical medicine and covers a wide range of conditions such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, spinal cord injury, orthopaedic trauma, amputation and many other conditions. The goal is to achieve the highest level of recovery and function possible for each patient, including physical compensatory mechanisms and psychological adjustment, educational as well as vocational and avocational (leisure) considerations.

    Training in rehabilitation medicine includes (beside general medicine and surgical basic training):

    • therapeutic exercise
    • physical modalities
    • prosthetics and orthotics
    • gait analysis
    • neurological
    • spinal and general rehabilitation interventions
    • psychosocial support
    • rehabilitation management.

    Specialists usually work in rehabilitation centres or units that are either stand-alone centres or attached to hospitals, and collaborate in multidisciplinary teams that include medical colleagues and nursing and allied health staff.

    Speciality contacts

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Australasian Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine
    145 Macquarie Street 
    Sydney
    NSW 2000 Australia
    Tel: 00 61 2 8247 6216
    Fax: 00 61 2 9251 7476
    Email: afrm@racp.edu.au
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Dr Samir Anwar – Consultant in Rehabilitation Medicine Rehab Plus
    PO Box 44 037 Pt Chevalier
    Auckland
    Tel: 09 815 5600
    Fax: 09 815 5601
    Email: samira@adhb.govt.nz

    Isabel Roos, Education Officer
    Australasian Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine
    Tel: 00 61 2 8076 6304
    Fax: 00 61 2 9256 9698
    Email: Rehab@racp.edu.au 

    Rehabilitation medicine factsheet

    Read more about rehabilitation medicine
    Health workforce New Zealand. 

    Workforce

    In 2014. there were approximately 16 active rehabilitation specialists in New Zealand, although this figure may not accurately reflect workforce numbers since doctors who are vocationally registered in other fields (such as internal medicine) may also include rehabilitation medicine in their work. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand rehabilitation medicine specialists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Rheumatology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About rheumatology

    Rheumatology deals with the treatment of musculoskeletal disease and focuses on inflammatory arthropathies. It includes the management of patients with connective tissue diseases, spondyloarthropathies, vasculitis, crystal arthropathies and pain syndromes.

    Specialty contacts 

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    New Zealand Rheumatology Association
    c/o Dr Doug White, Honorary Secretary
    Rheumatology Department - Waikato Hospital
    Pembroke Street
    Hamilton West 3204

    Assoc Professor Nicola Dalbeth
    Department of Rheumatology
    Greenlane Clinical Centre
    Private Bag 92189
    Greenlane West
    Epsom, Auckland
    Tel: 09 3074949 ext 26670 (secretary)
    Fax: 09 3754324
    Email: ndalbeth@adhb.govt.nz 

    Rheumatology factsheet

    Read more about rheumatology
    Health workforce New Zealand. 

    Workforce

     In 2014 there are around 68 rheumatologists practising in New Zealand. 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand rheumatologists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Sexual health

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About sexual health

    Sexual health medicine is the specialist area of medical practice principally concerned with the prevention of infection and care of people affected by sexually transmissible infections. It focuses on the individual, cultural, interpersonal and microbial factors that contribute to these diseases. Sexual health medicine includes the clinical and psychological issues concerned with reproductive medicine, sexual assault and sexual dysfunction. Sexual health medicine is also concerned with the promotion of the sexual health of the community by identifying and minimising the impact of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, through education, behaviour change, advocacy, clinical service provision, surveillance and research.

    Specialty contacts 

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Australasian Chapter of Sexual Health Medicine
    145 Macquarie Street Sydney NSW 2000
    Ph: +61 2 9256 9643
    Fax: +61 2 9256 9693
    Email: sexualhealthmed@racp.edu.au

    Dr Sunita Azariah – Clinical Director and Sexual Health Physician
    Auckland City Hospital
    Tel: 09 630 9783
    Email: SunitaA@adhb.govt.nz

    Sexual health factsheet

    Read more about sexual health
    Health workforce New Zealand.

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand sexual health specialists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Thoracic and sleep medicine

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About thoracic and sleep medicine

    Thoracic medicine is concerned with the respiratory system, which includes the upper airway, the lung, the chest wall and ventilatory control system. It uses diagnostic techniques, tests and procedures to assess and treat a wide range of conditions and diseases that affect the respiratory system. Sleep medicine is an integral part of thoracic medicine and is an ever-expanding field that includes:

    • sleep breathing disorders
    • disorders of daytime somnolence
    • insomnias
    • parasomnias
    • neurological and psychiatric disorders affecting sleep.

    An increasing number of thoracic physicians work in the field of sleep medicine.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on adult medicine training, contact:

    Royal Australasian College of Physicians
    New Zealand Office, PO Box 10 601 Wellington
    Tel: 04 472 6713
    Fax: 04 472 6718
    Email: racp@racp.org.nz
    Website: racp.edu.au

    Dr Mark O'Carroll – Clinical Director Respiratory Services
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949 ext 25170
    Email: MOCarroll@adhb.govt.nz

    Thoracic and sleep medicine factsheet

    Read more about thoracic and sleep medicine
    Health workforce New Zealand.

    Workforce

    In 2000 there were 32 specialists in thoracic and sleep medicine active in New Zealand, representing a specialist to population ratio of 1:119,719  (The health workforce: A training programme analysis, CTA, 2001, 63). 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand thoracic and sleep medicine specialists talk about the reality of working within this field

Surgery

  • Cardiothoracic surgery

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    Cardiothoracic surgery is the specialty that involves surgical management of conditions of the heart and thorax. About 60 per cent of adult cardiac surgery involves coronary artery bypass grafting, with most of the remainder comprising valve operations and aortic surgery. Thoracic surgery includes removal of lung cancers, mediastinal tumours, pleurodesis for pneumothorax and decortication for empyema. Some minimally invasive surgery is performed for example thoracoscopic procedures and endovascular aortic stenting. The specialty also encompasses heart and lung transplantation.

    In paediatric patients, surgery largely involves repair of congenital heart defects, the majority of which are corrected in the first year of life. Acquired valve defects are also dealt with in older children and teenagers.

    Cardiothoracic surgery is increasingly semi-elective (inpatients needing surgery) rather than elective (patients from home). There are also some emergency operations (eg, acute aortic dissection) when on-call. Surgeons also need to be available to re-operate after hours on their own patients (eg, bleeding after cardiac surgery). All these factors influence lifestyle.

    The main difference compared with other surgical specialties is that cardiothoracic surgery usually involves more operating (two to three full days in theatre), longer operations (typically four?five hours), and a higher mortality and morbidity rate (about 1 in 25 patients die after cardiac surgery). The specialty requires a high degree of technical skill, mental stamina, and emotional strength.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on training programmes
    Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
    Surgeons Gardens, Spring Street Melbourne,
    Vic 3000 Australia
    Tel: 00 61 3 9249 1200
    Fax: 00 61 3 9249 1219
    Website: surgeons.org 

    Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
    PO Box 7451 Wellington South
    New Zealand
    Tel: 04 385 8247
    Fax: 04 385 8873
    Email: college.NZ@surgeons.org

    Auckland

    Mr Paget Milsom - Director Cardiothoracic Service
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 630 9951
    Email: pmilsom@adhb.govt.nz

    Mrs Kirsten Finucane ? Paediatric Cardiothoracic Surgeon
    Starship Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949
    Email: kfinucane@adhb.govt.nz

    Mr Nicholas Kang ? Supervisor of Training
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 630 9951
    Email: nkang@adhb.govt.nz

    Cardiothoracic surgery factsheet

    Read more about  Health Workforce New Zealand information on cardiothoracic surgery

    Workforce

    • In 2014, there were 24 cardiothoracic surgeons in New Zealand working in five centres (Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin).
    • Around 6-12 cardiothoracic trainees across Australia and New Zealand complete their FRACS annually.
    • Most trainees would expect to spend at least another one two?years as a fellow before obtaining a consultant position.

    Income

    • Consultants and registrars are paid according to the MECA (multi-employer collective agreement) or negotiated salaries with individual DHBs based on amount of elective and after hours operating.
    • Private practice opportunities exist to supplement income but are somewhat limited and most cardiothoracic surgeons? income in New Zealand is derived from the public sector.

     New Zealand cardiothoracic surgeons talk about the reality of working within this field

  • General surgery

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About general surgery

    This section deals with specialist surgical training (SET) and contains information about the specialist surgical training programme in general surgery.

    The surgeon effects healing through operating. Surgeons examine patients, request investigations, decide whether an operation is necessary, operate and manage post-operative care.

    Specialty areas of the discipline include:

    • general surgery
    • cardiothoracic surgery
    • neurosurgery
    • otolaryngology-head and neck surgery
    • orthopaedic surgery
    • paediatric surgery
    • plastic and reconstructive surgery
    • urology
    • vascular surgery.

    Specialist surgical training is undertaken in one of these areas after acceptance into the Surgical Education and Training (SET) programme.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on training programmes
    Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
    Surgeons Gardens Spring Street Melbourne,
    Vic 3000 Australia
    Tel: 00 61 3 9276 7452
    Fax: 00 61 3 9249 1240
    Email: clare.peterson@surgeons.org
    Website: surgeons.org

    New Zealand Basic Surgical Training Committee
    Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
    PO Box 7451 Wellington
    Tel: 04 385 8247
    Fax: 04 385 8873
    E-mail: college.nz@surgeons.org

    AUCKLAND

    Mr Richard Wong She - Surgery Vocational Training Committee Chair
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92024 Auckland 

    General surgery factsheet

    Read more about Health Workforce New Zealand information on general surgery

    Workforce

    • There were 499 active surgeons working in New Zealand in 2000. This reflects a growth of 29% from 1994.
    • The largest subspecialty areas are general surgery and orthopaedic surgery, with 29% of the surgical workforce in each of these fields. 
    • In 2005 there were 55 advanced trainees in general surgery in New Zealand.
    • The recommended specialist to population ratio is 1:6,800. In New Zealand the ratio is about 1:7,700, representing a shortfall of 63 surgeons. This varies from one specialty to another - there is no shortfall in cardiothoracic or orthopaedic surgery but a significant shortfall in urology and neurosurgery (for further information about workforce projections, see the discussions of each surgical subspecialty that follow this chapter).
    • The recommended general surgeon to population ratio is 1:21,500. The actual ratio in New Zealand in 2000 was 1:26,421, representing a slight shortfall (The health workforce: A training programme analysis, CTA, 2001, 100-104).

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    Consultant, private sector: $400,000?$800,000.

    New Zealand general surgeons talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Neurosurgery

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About neurosurgery

    Neurosurgery is concerned with the surgical and non-surgical management of conditions of the central and peripheral nervous system. The majority of cranial work relates to tumours, trauma and vascular problems but the specialty offers a considerable range that includes craniofacial, epilepsy, pain and hydrocephalus surgery. Spinal work is largely degenerative and tumour-related.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on training programmes
    College of Surgeons Gardens
    240 Spring Street Melbourne
    Victoria 3000 Australia
    Tel: +61 3 9249 1294
    Fax + 61 3 9249 1293
    Email: neurosurgery.chairman@surgeons.org

    New Zealand Office

    PO Box 7451 Wellington
    Tel: 04 385 8248
    Fax: 04 385 8873
    Email: College.NZ@surgeons.org

    Mr. Andrew Law - Consultant Neurosurgeon
    Auckland City Hospital
    Park Rd Grafton
    Auckland New Zealand
    Tel: 09 307 4949, ext 25770
    Email: alaw@adhb.govt.nz

    Neurosurgery factsheet

    Read more about neurosurgery
    Health workforce New Zealand.

    Workforce

    • In 2000, there were 14 neurosurgeons active in New Zealand, representing 3% of the total number of surgeons. In 2005 there were four specialist trainees in neurosurgery located in New Zealand.
    • The recommended specialist surgeon to population ratio for neurosurgery is 1:175,000. The actual ratio in New Zealand in 2000 was 1:272, 643, indicating a significant shortage (The health workforce: A training programmed analysis, CTA, 2001, 101-104). 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand neurosurgeons talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Ophthalmology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    Watch the Ophthalmology - RMO Careers Fair 2018 video

    About ophthalmology

    An ophthalmologist diagnoses and manages disorders of the eye and related structures. The practice of ophthalmology comprises medical and surgical components and involves the prevention of blindness, the promotion of eye health and the rehabilitation of those with visual disability.

    Subspecialty areas include: Corneal and external disease.

    • glaucoma
    • neuro-ophthalmology
    • uveitis (ocular inflammation)
    • oculo-plastics and orbital surgery
    • paediatric ophthalmology
    • vitreoretinal disease.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on training programmes

    Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists
    94?98 Chalmers Street Surrey Hills
    NSW 2010 Australia
    Tel: 00 61 2 9690 1001
    Fax: 00 61 2 9690 1321
    Email: ranzco@ranzco.edu
    Website: ranzco.edu

    Dr Stuart Carroll - Ophthalmology vocational training committee chair
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 630 9943
    Email: stuartc@adhb.govt.nz

    Dr Jo Sims - Director of training
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 630 9943
    Email: josims@adhb.co.nz

    Ophthalmology factsheet

    Read more about Health Workforce New Zealand information on ophthalmology

    Workforce

    • In 2014, there were 83 active ophthalmologists working in New Zealand.

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand ophthalmologists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Orthopaedic surgery

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About orthopaedic surgery

    Orthopaedic surgery is the specialty of surgery concerned with diseases of and injuries to the musculoskeletal system, namely the spine, upper and lower extremities. In order to receive vocational registration as an orthopaedic surgeon you must have gained comprehensive training in all aspects of the specialty. All surgeons, particularly those who work in provincial areas, must maintain breadth of knowledge to enable them to deal with a wide range of conditions. Surgeons who are based in larger metropolitan will often specialise in one or more aspects of the discipline, for example:

    • spine surgery
    • joint replacement surgery
    • knee surgery
    • upper extremity surgery.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on training programmes

    Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
    New Zealand Office
    Mrs Trish McLean
    Specialist Training Administrator
    PO Box 7451 Wellington
    Tel: 04 385 8248
    Fax: 04 385 8873

    Tom Geddes – Orthopaedic department
    Middlemore Hospital
    Private Bag 93311
    Otahuhu, Auckland
    Tel: 09 276 000
    Email: tgeddes@middlemore.co.nz

    Haemish Crawford – Ascot Hospital
    Private Bag 28912
    Remuera, Auckland
    Tel: 09 520 9633
    Email: hcrawford@abjs.co.nz

    Orthopaedic surgery factsheet

    Read more about Health Workforce New Zealand information on orthopaedic surgery

    Workforce

    The New Zealand Orthopaedic Association and the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons attempt to tailor workforce requirements to training numbers. 

    • In 2005, there were 155 active orthopaedic surgeons in New Zealand, representing 29% of the total number of surgeons. There are 46 advanced trainees in orthopaedic surgery in 2007.

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    Employment opportunities exist in the private sphere where rewards are generally higher but collegial activities and opportunities to teach are fewer. It is usual for specialists to divide their time between public and private practice.

    New Zealand orthopaedic surgeons talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Otolaryngology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About otolaryngology – head and neck surgery

    This specialty is known by many names including otorhinolaryngology or otolaryngology (ORL for short) and ear, nose and throat surgery (or ENT). As a result of expertise gained in dealing with the upper aerodigestive tract, the specialty has evolved to include surgery for tumours of the head and neck region. The official title is now ‘Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery’ (ORL-HNS).

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on training programmes

    Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
    College of Surgeons’ Gardens
    Spring Street Melbourne
    Vic 3000, Australia
    Tel: 00 61 3 9249 1200
    Fax: 00 61 3 9249 1219
    Website: surgeons.org

    The Australian Society of Otolaryngology
    Head & Neck Surgery Ltd
    Suite 403, Level 4
    68 Alfred Street Milsons Point
    NSW 2061 Australia
    Tel: +61 2 9954 5856
    Fax: +61 2 9957 6863
    Website: asohns.org.au

    New Zealand Office
    PO Box 7451 Wellington
    Tel: 04 385 8248
    Fax: 04 385 8873
    Email: college.nz@surgeons.org

    Martyn Fields - Chairman NZ-TEAC for ORL-HSN
    Dunedin Hospital
    201 Great King St
    Dunedin New Zealand

    John Chaplin - Auckland ORL supervisor  
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92024
    Tel:09 307 4949

    Otolaryngology factsheet

    Read more about Health Workforce New Zealand information on otolaryngology

    Workforce

    • In 2000, there were 14 neurosurgeons active in New Zealand, representing 3% of the total number of surgeons.
    • In 2005, there were four specialist trainees in neurosurgery located in New Zealand.
    • The recommended specialist surgeon to population ratio for neurosurgery is 1:175,000. The actual ratio in New Zealand in 2000 was 1:272,643, indicating a significant shortage (The health workforce: A training programmed analysis, CTA, 2001, 101-104).

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand otolaryngology surgeons talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Paediatric surgery

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About paediatric surgery

    Paediatric surgery involves abdominal, thoracic and urological surgery for children under the age of 16 years. It also includes trauma, oncological and neonatal surgery, and surgery for children with a variety of congenital conditions.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on training programmes

    Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
    Surgeons Gardens
    Spring Street, Melbourne
    Vic 3000, Australia
    Tel: 00 61 3 9249 1200
    Fax: 00 61 3 9249 1219
    Email: rebecca.warnecke@surgeons.org
    Website:surgeons.org

    RACS New Zealand Office
    PO Box 7451, Wellington
    Tel: 04 385 8248
    Fax: 04 385 8873
    Email: racs@surgeons.co.nz

    Professor Spencer Beasley - Paediatric Surgeon, Christchurch Hospital
    PO Box 4710, Christchurch
    Tel: 03 364 0432
    Fax: 03 364 1584
    Email: spencer.beasley@cdhb.govt.nz

    Mr Philip Morreau – Paediatric surgeon
    Starship Children’s Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024, Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949, ext 6098
    Email: pmorreau@adhb.govt.nz

    Workforce

    • In 2007, there were 14 paediatric surgeons active in New Zealand, representing 2% of the total number of surgeons.
    • In 2007, there will be five New Zealand based trainees different of stages of their training either in New Zealand, Australia, or further afield
    • The recommended specialist surgeon to population ratio for paediatric surgery is 1:250,000. The actual ratio in New Zealand in 2000 was 1:319,250, indicating a shortage of specialists in this field (The health workforce: A training programmed analysis, CTA, 2001, 101-104).
    • Safe hours of practice plus outreach commitments may mean additional appointments are required.
    • There are currently three consultant posts in Christchurch, Wellington and Hamilton and five in Auckland.

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    There is some scope for private practice although remuneration levels depend on the number of hours that you work and are not as high as for other surgical specialities.

    New Zealand paediatric surgeons talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Plastic and reconstructive surgery

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About plastic and reconstructive surgery

    Plastic surgery involves repair and reconstruction due to trauma, or the correction of congenital defects. It aims to improve physical function as well as physical appearance. Cosmetic surgery is also a significant aspect of this specialty.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on training programmes

    Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
    Surgeons Gardens
    Spring Street, Melbourne
    Vic 3000, Australia
    Tel: 00 61 3 9249 1200
    Fax: 00 61 3 9249 1219
    Email: rebecca.warnecke@surgeons.org
    Website: surgeons.org

    Mr. Murray Beagley – Director of surgical training
    Middlemore Hospital
    Private Bag 93 311
    Otahuhu, Auckland
    Email: mbeagley@middlemore.co.nz

    RACS New Zealand Office
    PO Box 7451, Wellington
    Tel: 04 385 8248
    Fax: 04 385 8873
    Email: racs@surgeons.co.nz

    Workforce

    • In 2000, there were 31 plastic and reconstructive surgeons active in New Zealand, representing 6% of the total number of surgeons.
    • The recommended specialist surgeon to population ratio for plastic surgery is 1:100,000. The actual ratio in New Zealand in 2000 was 1:123,581 indicating a shortage of specialists in this area (The health workforce: A training programme analysis, CTA, 2001, 101-104).

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand plastics and reconstructive surgeons talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Urology

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About urology

    Urology is the surgical specialty that deals with the urinary system in males and females and the reproductive system in males. It is a broad-based specialty that includes:

    • oncology
    • kidney stone disease
    • incontinence
    • transplants
    • infertility.

    Specialty contacts

    For up-to-date information on training programmes

    Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
    Surgeons Gardens
    Spring Street, Melbourne
    Vic 3000, Australia
    Tel: 00 61 3 9249 1200
    Fax: 00 61 3 9249 1219
    Email: rebecca.warnecke@surgeons.org
    Website: surgeons.org

    RACS New Zealand Office
    PO Box 7451, Wellington
    Tel: 04 385 8248
    Fax: 04 385 8873
    Email: racs@surgeons.co.nz

    Mr Michael Rice - Urologist
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 027 4 80 1906
    Email: rice@xtra.co.nz

    Chairman - Board of Urology
    Suite 512, Eastpoint 180 Ocean Street
    Edgecliff, NSW 2027 Australia
    Tel: 00 61 2 9362 8644
    Fax: 00 61 2 9362 1433
    Email: secretary@urosoc.org.au

    Urology factsheet

    Read more Health Workforce New Zealand information about urology

    Workforce

    • In 2000, there were 14 neurosurgeons active in New Zealand, representing 3% of the total number of surgeons.
    • In 2005, there were four specialist trainees in neurosurgery located in New Zealand.
    • The recommended specialist surgeon to population ratio for neurosurgery is 1:175,000. The actual ratio in New Zealand in 2000 was 1:272,643 indicating a significant shortage (The health workforce: A training programme analysis, CTA, 2001, 101-104). 

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    New Zealand urologists talk about the reality of working within this field

  • Vascular surgery

    Page 1 Copy 3 Created with Sketch.

    About vascular surgery

    Vascular surgery is the subspecialty that deals with all blood vessels outside the brain and chest.

    Training information

    The training programme is run through the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. Doctors are eligible to apply in PGY2. The programme is five years and is bi-national. There are requirements in operative surgery, endovascular surgery, ultrasound, research and a final examination for FRACS (vascular). Usually trainees will be rotated through approved centres in Australia and New Zealand.

    For up-to-date information on training programmes

    Royal Australasian College of Surgeons
    Surgical education and training
    Email: college.nz@surgeons.org

    Australia & New Zealand Society of Vascular Surgeons (ANZSVS)

    Abby Richardson - Executive officer
    - Board in Vascular Surgery
    - Australian and New Zealand Society of Vascular Surgery
    Website: anzsvs.org.au

    Royal Australasian College of Surgeons - Australian Office
    College of Surgeons' Gardens
    Spring Street
    Melbourne VIC 3000
    Tel: +61 3 9249 1269
    Fax: +61 3 9249 1240
    Email: boardofvascular.surgery@surgeons.org

    Mr Peter Vanniasingham - Supervisor, Vascular Surgery Training
    Vascular Services
    Vascular Surgery
    Auckland City Hospital
    Private Bag 92 024 Auckland
    Tel: 09 307 4949, ext 23909
    Fax: 09 375 4357
    Email: peterv@adhb.govt.nz

    Vascular surgery factsheet

    Read more about Health Workforce New Zealand information on vascular surgery

    Workforce

    • In 2014, there are 25 surgeons who are members of the Australian and NZ Society of Vascular Surgery.
    • Some of these perform general and vascular surgery. It is likely that most surgeons in the future will performing just vascular surgery, with an increasing amount of endovascular procedures.

    Income

    See the New Zealand DHB Senior Medical and Dental Officers Collective Agreement

    Consultant, private sector: $200,000–$500,000.

    New Zealand vascular surgeons talk about the reality of working within this field